Thursday, July 13, 2017

ATR LEADER ASHER'S EMAIL

If you are a Department of Education employee and you wish to watch Absent Teacher Reserve head Randy Asher's webinar on the ATRs, go to this link.

Below is Asher's statement on the ATRs. There isn't much new here but we print everything for the record and if you can find something different in Asher's words, please tell us.

On the issue of press reports calling ATRs poor quality teachers, I am not going to link to any of them. I read three stories on ATRs. I saw quotes from people who aren't in the classroom and nothing from any teacher or ATR. That is all you need to know about the biased press that is often anti-teacher.


Good Afternoon,

Earlier today, we announced updated placement procedures intended to reduce the size of the reserve pool, and ultimately to help teachers and administrators get back into schools where they are needed most.

The procedures announced today are discussed in more depth in this pre-recorded webinar

In summary:
·        Reserve pool teachers can be assigned across district lines within the Borough.
·        Beginning around October 15, we’ll place reserve pool teachers into vacancies funded by schools.
·        After the match to vacancies and long term absence coverage, we plan to significantly reduce rotations for most remaining reserve pool members.
·        If a provisionally hired teacher receives a Highly Effective or Effective rating at the end of the 2017-18 school year, and there is a vacancy in the same license area for the following school year, and there are no extraordinary circumstances, that educator will be permanently hired by the school.
·        The Voluntary Severance Program period is closing on July 14, 2017.

The ATR pool was neither the destination nor experience that led any of us to a career as professional educators.  Most of us became educators with noble intentions and the desire to have a positive impact on the lives of the students we serve.  The most effective way to achieve this goal is to serve in a classroom as a teacher or in a leadership role as an administrator.  We are looking forward to working with those in the ATR pool to provide opportunities to achieve these goals.

For those who wish to explore other options, the Voluntary Severance Program will remain open until July 14, 2017.  Please follow the specific instructions in the webcast to participate.

If you have questions or concerns, please email atrassignment@schools.nyc.gov

Working together, we can help ensure ATR teachers and administrators are given the opportunity to serve the 1.1 million students of New York City in a meaningful way.

Sincerely,
Randy
Randy J. Asher
Senior Advisor, Talent Management & Innovation

16 comments:

Anonymous said...

Worst fear, force placed in a shithole with no escape.

Anonymous said...

Tell Randi about Randy.

Anonymous said...

What do you mean no escape? Use the open market. Oh yeah, it's not exactly fair.

Anonymous said...

Oh, I tried, many times, for many years.

Anonymous said...

Between all ATRS should begin to name schools where there may be an issue. It would be helpful to know which schools are oppressive and/or target senior staff.

Anonymous said...

HHhhhmmmmmm! Oh, that's right. On to plan B. There would be no plan B. You would just be stuck.

Anonymous said...

Most if not all Campus Magnet Schools, Far Rock, Beach Channel and August Martin. You could also add the wonderful learning environments at Springfield gardens and Flushing. These centers of learning excellence end careers! Almost forgot the worst place of them all Bryant! Good luck my Atr friends.

Anonymous said...

And what happens when I get cursed on September 7 because I had the nerve to tell a student to put a phone away?

Anonymous said...

Manhattan - Art and Design HS (punitive, oppressive), Life Sciences Secondary School veteran staff are getting targetted. Manhattan Village Academy hardly has any veteran staff (if any) and wants the best kids. (Principal here got fined - read the story: http://nypost.com/2011/09/06/bad-apple-principal-plea-deals/).
University Neighborhood High School is oppressive. LaGuardia - not sure but there were issues with the principal (petition and on the Post) and there's turn around with staff. Urban Assembly School for Emergency Management - it's in the basement, punitive, disorganized, lack communication, target veterans). Etc., etc., etc.

Anonymous said...

4:56...This is what we all need to do. Anything that violates the discipline code, demand that it is put into OORS, and demand proof with the confirmation number. Email every incident to the UFT and supes office. At least then it will be in writing and tallied. Then, when a student tells you to suck his/her dick, take out your cellphone and call the police and press charges for sexual harassment. Then take out the discipline code, go to the principal and show that it is an automatic suspension. When you get called a faggot, thats a level 4, suspension, based on bullying because of your perceived sexual preference. White piece of shit? Same thing...

Anonymous said...

Restorative Justice is what is being done now. Schools are trying to not do suspensions.

Anonymous said...

Understood, thats why you have to force the hand.

Anonymous said...

It's a concept that is idealistic, but like most of these programs/ideas, there is a lack of funding.

waitingforsupport said...

I second the comments about University Neighborhood and Manhattan Village. University admin are toxic and vindictive--document everything. Manhattan Village admin are disrespectful and odd.

Anonymous said...

University Neighborhood HS admin are micromanagers. Staff get to the school before the principal. It's a depressing place. Manhattan Village principal is paranoid and sarcastic. The AP Rick is obnoxious and snippy. The other AP was neutral - guess this AP may not want to participate in the drama of the other two.

Anonymous said...

Restorative Justice sounds good, but unfortunately the funding is not available inside the schools to carry this initiative through successfully. This would take a lot of effort. Restorative Justice is up against gangs, bad parenting, the still developing adolescent, poverty, the desensitization of technology, etc. DOE knows how to come up with initiatives, but it does not come up with the labor force to implement these initiatives. Society as a whole needs to put more effort into the education of students. It's not just about saying there is an interest. It's about parents taking the time to raise their children and if they cannot raise them, then don't have them. Where is the responsibility within society to do the right thing?